Dr. Ole J. Forsberg’s Courses

Upper Division Courses Taught

STAT 40x3: Statistical Methods II (for Social Scientists)

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for further study and research in the social sciences. Course content includes (but is not limited to) descriptive statistics, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, and factorial experiments.

STAT 4073: Statistics for Engineers and Scientists

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for further study and job preparation in the fields of Engineering and the sciences by teaching statistics and probability skills. The course content includes (but is not limited to) descriptive statistics, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, factorial experiments, and statistical quality control.

POLS 6123: Quantitative Methods for Fire and Emergency Management

This online course is offered through Oklahoma State University for the Fall 2010 semester. This course will build upon previous graduate and undergraduate method courses in fire and emergency management. Emphasis on descriptive, inferential, and non-parametric statistics for use in analyzing data relevant to the several disciplines.

GVPT 101: An Introduction to Political Theory — OL2

This online course is offered through the University of Maryland University College for the Fall 2010 semester. This course offers a survey of the major political philosophers from the pre-Socratics to Barry Goldwater. Other philosophers include Locke, Hobbes, Augustine, Plato, and Jefferson.

International Law

Students taking International Law should seek to examine the legal consequences of the fact that contemporary nation-states are creations of international law. Additionally, this course engages the many controversies over who is subject to this law, how the law is created and enforced, and the relationship between international law and international politics.

A History of Terrorism

This course examines one specific aspect of world politics—that dealing with the causes and effects of terrorist activity. Taking the extant research as a starting point, we evaluate this research in light of the current difficulties in studying terrorism. To that end, this course trains you to be better terrorism researchers. This necessitates that you learn how to become better researchers and thinkers.

Global Terrorism

This course examines one specific aspect of world politics—that dealing with the causes and effects of terrorist activity. Taking the extant research as a starting point, we evaluate this research in light of the current difficulties in studying terrorism. To that end, this course trains you to be better terrorism researchers. This necessitates that you learn how to become better researchers.

Ethnicity and Conflict

The two courses concerning ethnicity and conflict examine political and violent conflicts amongst ethnic and national groups and the challenges these conflicts pose for democratic and democratizing states. Such groups include the Ulster Catholics, the Sri Lankan Tamils, and the Spanish Basques. What do all three of these have in common and why have they resorted to extensive violence against their state? This course examines what the researchers have said.

American Foreign Policy

Students taking American Foreign Policy should seek to study several key problems of contemporary American foreign policy. The course will cover several theories of foreign policy, aspects specific to the American political system, and several case studies highlighting these aspects. Additional case studies covered will include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, human rights, and oil dependency. As this course fundamentally deals with current issues, additional classroom discussion and assignments will center on applications of theories and history to current events.

Contemporary Issues in International Relations

What is happening in the world? What caused it? What can we do to solve the problems? This class strives to answer these three question, while strengthening your knowledge of world affairs and the theoretical underpinnings of International Relations. By the end of the semester, you should be able to intelligently discuss the causes of many of the current world issues with anyone you meet in the street. Here, we make two assumptions: First, there is a possible solution to these problems. Second, we want a solution and are willing to sacrifice to achieve those solutions.

Introductory Courses Taught

Introduction to World Politics

This course is a wide-ranging survey of world politics including an overview of the international system, problems of conflict and war, political geography, major forms of government, cultural and economic sources of politics and policy. Simple and extended simulations as well as case studies based on contemporary events are added to increase the applicability of the topics taught. As there is no prerequisite for the course, an introduction to relevant political concepts is prepended to the course to get the students thinking in terms of Political Science.

Introduction to American Government and Politics

Students taking American Government should seek to study the power structures existing in America. These structures include formal governmental agencies and structures, such as the Congress and the Presidency, along with informal structure, such as the bureaucracy, interest groups, and the media. Special attention will be given to the foundations of the constitution, the political culture of the United States, the paradox of democracy, and political socialization.

Introduction to Political Science

In the field of Political Science, there are no fewer than six subfields: American Political System, Law and Legalism, Normative Theory, Methodology, International Relations, and Comparative Politics. Introduction to Political Science covers the last four areas.

Introduction to International Relations

This course delves into international relations more deeply. It offers what amounts to broad brush strokes of the entire IR subfield. The underlying theme for this year’s course is ‘explanations of history.’ That is what IR offers all: explanations of what has happened, theories through which we can better understand the world around us and our place in that world.